Internet has emerged as the most empowering tool of the 21st century. However, the new technological tools can also be subject to discords and confrontations with the government of the day. There are already reports of governments aiming to crub internet freedom. Since 1995, governments around the world are making efforts to balance a need to deal with serious issues such as security, internet freedom, internet accessibility, but in repressive societies, these concerns often serve as convenient pretext to engage in censorship or surveillance of the internet that is stated to violate the rights and privacy of users and threatens the free flow of information and access to internet. India is stated to have the third highest number of internet users in the world by crossing 100 million users (around 40 million users use the internet via mobile phones) in December 2011. However, considering India’s population crossing 1 billion marks, this figure do not give a complacent picture of provisioning Internet in India as a basic utility service. Reports say, despite increasing affordability of PCs and internet penetration, the net penetration rate is low, which is less than 10 per cent compared to global standards. A 100 million internet users cannot be considered a critical landmark unless internet use in India enters a critical period of growth with universal access. Development deficits and divides cannot be bridged unless information access and services are denied. And access to Internet is the much required utility platform towards this.

Information accessibility is the first step of empowerment in a country like India, where 70% population lives in 638,365 villages, and most of them are located in the remotest regions of the country. Reportedly, rural and underdeveloped countries are not able to access information due to lack of basic information, infrastructure and means to access information.

Digital Empowerment Foundation initiated “Internet Rights” in 2011 to advocate ‘internet access for all’ at the national level. As its first step of the project, DEF & APC jointly submitted their first UPR (Universal Periodic Review) in 2011 focusing on internet rights and making internet as an effective tool to access right to information in India.

IR engages with variety of organizations, civil society groups, and policy experts to bring up the internet issues, challenges and solutions. Thus, IR engages with organizations, civil society groups, media, individuals which are working and focusing on:

  • Human rights
  • Access to information
  • Gender and technology
  • Right to information
  • Law & governance
  • Cyber surveillance
  • Media & access
  • Access to education
  • Sexual rights

IR collaborates with social organisations, communities, media and do-gooders in a variety of ways – from research, policy advocacy, campaigns and editorial specials to social media campaigns and on-the-ground impact projects. We engage in three ways –

  • Challenges – to reveal
  • Advocacy – to work out together
  • Trumpet the campaign – voice the rights
+ Approach to HR

Internet has emerged as the most empowering tool of the 21st century. However, the new technological tools can also be subject to discords and confrontations with the government of the day. There are already reports of governments aiming to crub internet freedom. Since 1995, governments around the world are making efforts to balance a need to deal with serious issues such as security, internet freedom, internet accessibility, but in repressive societies, these concerns often serve as convenient pretext to engage in censorship or surveillance of the internet that is stated to violate the rights and privacy of users and threatens the free flow of information and access to internet. India is stated to have the third highest number of internet users in the world by crossing 100 million users (around 40 million users use the internet via mobile phones) in December 2011. However, considering India’s population crossing 1 billion marks, this figure do not give a complacent picture of provisioning Internet in India as a basic utility service. Reports say, despite increasing affordability of PCs and internet penetration, the net penetration rate is low, which is less than 10 per cent compared to global standards. A 100 million internet users cannot be considered a critical landmark unless internet use in India enters a critical period of growth with universal access. Development deficits and divides cannot be bridged unless information access and services are denied. And access to Internet is the much required utility platform towards this.

Information accessibility is the first step of empowerment in a country like India, where 70% population lives in 638,365 villages, and most of them are located in the remotest regions of the country. Reportedly, rural and underdeveloped countries are not able to access information due to lack of basic information, infrastructure and means to access information.

Digital Empowerment Foundation initiated “Internet Rights” in 2011 to advocate ‘internet access for all’ at the national level. As its first step of the project, DEF & APC jointly submitted their first UPR (Universal Periodic Review) in 2011 focusing on internet rights and making internet as an effective tool to access right to information in India.

+ Join Hands to HR

IR engages with variety of organizations, civil society groups, and policy experts to bring up the internet issues, challenges and solutions. Thus, IR engages with organizations, civil society groups, media, individuals which are working and focusing on:

  • Human rights
  • Access to information
  • Gender and technology
  • Right to information
  • Law & governance
  • Cyber surveillance
  • Media & access
  • Access to education
  • Sexual rights

IR collaborates with social organisations, communities, media and do-gooders in a variety of ways – from research, policy advocacy, campaigns and editorial specials to social media campaigns and on-the-ground impact projects. We engage in three ways –

  • Challenges – to reveal
  • Advocacy – to work out together
  • Trumpet the campaign – voice the rights

ADVISORY COMMITTEE

Advisory Committee

Role of India Project Advisory Committee Members

PLANNING

The Committee Members provide guidance and inputs to the Project team from time to time in planning the various activity variables of the project. This includes planning for policy and implementation aspects of key activities as per project mandate and goals to contribute to the overall benefit to ultimate IMPACT beneficiaries. This also includes planning for research papers, reports, and issue papers.

SUB-COMMITTEES

It may be necessary to form Project sub-committees to strengthen the project. The Advisory Committee Members may develop sub-committees which have assigned tasks in specific areas on the basis of project activities and sub-activities.

IMPLEMENTATION

The Committee Members contribute timely inputs and interventions in implementation aspects of the project including  research, advocacy, policy, knowledge building and sharing components of the project. This may require their valuable presence in implementation stations (workshops, stakeholders meetings, advocacy campaigns and so on).

MEETINGS

The Committee Members shall play the significant role in attending and contributing in the India Project Advisory Committee meeting which shall be convened every three months or as-per need as decided by the Project Advisory Committee members.

PROJECT OUTREACH & PROMOTION

The Committee Members will see enough reason and relevance to promote the cause and objectives of the project amongst relevant stakeholders. They may connect the Project Team with such stakeholders to strengthen the goals and outcome of the project for wider community gains on promotion and protection of human rights on the Internet.

OTHER TASKS

During the project period of 3 years, the Advisory Committee Members may require to contribute in other aspects of the project as and when arises without putting the Members in adverse and compulsorily obliging situations.

Project Advisory Committee Members

Project team

PROJECT TEAM

PARTNERS

IMPACT-LOGO-300x156The Association for Progressive Communications (APC) has teamed up with members and partners in India, Pakistan and Malaysia to protect and promote human rights on the internet. Internet-related policies and the ways they are implemented contribute to strengthening human rights online and offline, and support democracy-building. But the gaps in understanding of internet rights by key actors in India, Malaysia, and Pakistan, negatively impacts how rights and freedoms in these countries are exercised.

Apc-LogoAPC is both a network and an organisation. APC’s mission is to empower and support organisations, social movements and individuals in and through the use of information and communication technologies (ICTs) to build strategic communities and initiatives for the purpose of making meaningful contributions to equitable human development, social justice, participatory political processes and environmental sustainability.

Empower-Logo-EMPOWER is a non-governmental organisation that promotes and supports actions that advance justice and democracy, based on feminist and human rights principles. We work with women and youths to realise their potential in the areas of political participation, economic empowerment, and civil liberties. Empower is a Malaysian partner to implement the project in the country.

b4a_logo_3Bytes for All (B4A), Pakistan is a human rights organization and a research think tank with a focus on Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs). It experiments with and organizes debate on the relevance of ICTs for sustainable development and strengthening human rights movements in the country.

Contact Us

CONTACT US

EMAIL research@defindia.org
Tel: 011-26532786 / 26532787

Digital Empowerment Foundation
House No. 44, 3rd Floor,
Kaalu Sarai, (Near IIT Flyover)
New Delhi – 110016

Leave Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

clear formSubmit